PEER 2

PEER 2

Chronic pain tends to interfere with an individual’s day-to-day activities. Treatment of chronic pain can be daunting for the patient and the healthcare provider. As documented by Peppin et al. (2015), the increasing number of chronic-pain patients and the scarcity of qualified pain practitioners necessitate a new and effective strategy that values the complicated nature of chronic pain and provides an effective blueprint to solve these challenges. Holtrop et al. (2019) hold that knowledge about how people with chronic pain have flourishingly managed their pain is essential as it helps care providers treat other individuals with chronic pain. The authors argue that, with the patient at the centre and the provider implementing a holistic approach to finding practical ways suitable to each person, this method tends to foster patient-centred care.

References

Holtrop, J. S., Fisher, M., Martinez, D. E., Simpson, M., Awadallah, N. S., Nease, D. E., Zittleman, L., & Westfall, J. M. (2019). What works for managing chronic pain: An appreciative inquiry qualitative analysis. Journal of Primary Care Community Health, 10. https://doi.org/10.1177/2150132719885286 Links to an external site.

Peppin, J. F., Cheatle, M. D., Kirsh, K. L., & McCarberg, B. H. (2015). The complexity model: a novel approach to improve chronic pain care. Pain Medicine, 16(4), 653-666. Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/painmedicine/article/16/4/653/2460532