Pregnancy Policy in Police Departments

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Internet Question 4

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Name

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Institution

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Pregnancy Policy in Police Departments

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Being pregnant in law enforcement is an additional challenge to being a female in this profession. Only a handful of departments have policies that accommodate pregnant officers who are often required to present proof from a certified physician (Conelly, 2011). The policies most of the time entails temporarily transferring pregnant officers to a less dangerous position throughout the pregnancy and for a few months after. This accommodation always depends on whether the department can “reasonably accommodate it”.

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Professionals recommend the development of a pregnancy policy separate from a maternity policy (Smith, n.d.). This policy outlines how to accommodate a pregnant officer while she is still able to work in whatever capacity. The proposed policy goes on to include the same treatment given to injured police officers. This approach includes assigning pregnant officers to light duties such as desk assignments and keeping them away from operating firearms, working the field or any other stressful situations that come with the job not ideal to an expectant woman. This policy not should at any point require a woman to take leave as long as they are in a position to contribute in various capacities. It is not correct to categorize pregnancy under illness because illness requires time away from work entirely depending on the seriousness of the case. In addition, the policy requires departments to consider issuing women with uniforms that ensure comfort and give room for their growing bodies.

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Assuming that a female officer cannot do her job properly violates the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 that categorically prohibits discrimination against pregnant women (Peck, 2017). The capacity of women to deliver on their policing duties lies more on the health hazards attributed to handling firearms, with destructive noises and toxic lead than incapacitation. Although the PDA act does not require departments to give pregnant officers preferential treatment or prohibit them from giving this group favors, it does not allow compulsory unpaid or partial disability pay leave.

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References

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Conelly, L. (2011, June 24). Pregnancy and Policing. Retrieved from https://www.policemag.com/373852/pregnancy-and-policing

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Peck, E. (2017, October 7). Why Female Police Officers Are Increasingly Speaking Up About Pregnancy Discrimination. Retrieved from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/women-police-officers-pregnant_n_59d7d66ee4b072637c43f0d1Smith, B. B. (n.d.). What do you do with a pregnant cop? Retrieved from https://www.policeone.com/women-officers/articles/what-do-you-do-with-a-pregnant-cop-tvrcF8Z13oyiXjor/

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