Shorelines are temporary geological and topographic features since they can be altered by agents of erosion most of all water

Shorelines

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Shorelines are temporary geological and topographic features since they can be altered by agents of erosion most of all water. The Shorelines are regarded as temporary geologic and topographic features because there is always movement driven to the shorelines by the waves of the wind. The waves bring about contact between land and water in which eroding takes place and the shorelines get eroded into the sea. Shorelines are said to be geological features since the bedrock that composes the rocky shorelines was formed through geological processes millions of years ago. They are considered temporary and geological since the water moves in battering against the shore and it slowly wears away. All the materials found around the environment of the shore get constantly moved around by current activities and waves (Lutgens, Tarbuck & Tasa, 2005).

Moreover, there are materials deposited from the sea such as sand making the shore not to have any permanent topographical or geological features. The common forces that affect deposition and erosion around shorelines are waves. The wave’s moves gravel and this brings about Erosion. These current in the sea cause hydraulic activities bringing about erosion. The rise is ocean level that is brought about by human activities and climatic changes is a factor that affects erosion. When the waves are calmer more sediments of sand get deposited on the shorelines, and during storms then bigger breaking waves draw the deposits towards the sea causing erosion Shorelines are topographic features since they are surface features of a place or region on a map.

Reference

Lutgens, F. K., Tarbuck, E.J. & Tasa, D. (2005). Foundations of Earth Science. Houston, TX:

Prentice Hall

Preparing for the impacts of climate change: A strategy for long term planning and management

Of the shoreline in the context of climate change predictions: Summary report. (2001). Ventnor: Standing Conference on Problems Associated with the Coastline.